Free Internet Speed Test | Tips and Tricks to Improve Your Internet Speed Quickly

To have Internet access at home, there are several connection types that you can use. First, there is the dial-up access where you will utilize your existing landline service to connect to the Internet. The main disadvantage of this type of connection is the slow speed.

Next, there is the mobile broadband connection which is suitable for those who often travel. With this, all you need is to subscribe to a mobile broadband service provider who will give you the equipment to use. For example, if you are given a USB dongle, that is what you will use to have Internet connection even when you are traveling.

Third, there is the more popular broadband Internet connection. This is a high-speed type of connecting to the Internet which allows you to be online on a 24/7 basis. Among the other types, this is probably the most preferred and reliable connection that you can have.

Finally, you can get connected to the Internet via wireless broadband networks. Read on to learn more about the pros and cons of wireless broadband.

Wireless Broadband: The Basics

Wireless broadband service is actually similar to the traditional ADSL or Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. It is one of the types of broadband available today which aims to provide high-speed Internet access to subscribers.

The distinctive characteristic of wireless broadband is, just as the name implies, you can connect to the Internet over a wireless connection.

To have a deeper understanding of what wireless broadband is all about, here is a quick list of its benefits:

- Wireless broadband offers the same high-speed connection as ADSL. – There is no need for you to have a second phone line. – You can stay connected to the Internet 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. – There is more mobility even while you are using your computer within your home – because you will not be restricted by wires.

Is Wireless Broadband Connection Safe to Use at Home?

One of the main concerns that subscribers have when it comes to wireless broadband connection is whether it is safe to have at home or not.

Here are some of the concerns that wireless broadband subscribers have concerning the safety of this type of connection:

- Can hackers actually ‘steal’ your information once they get into your wireless broadband connection? – Can other people within the vicinity tap into your wireless broadband connection without your permission? – Can other users ‘see’ the files on the computer that you are using if they are able to go through your wireless Internet connection?

To answer all of these safety concerns, there are a few things that you can do. First, make sure to enable wireless security on your network. Anyone who wants to access your wireless Internet connection needs a wireless network key.

Second, you should have a firewall installed to protect your computer files. Third, you need to make sure that your anti-virus program, your anti-spyware and all the other programs designed to protect your computer from harm are all updated.

As long as your wireless broadband connection is properly configured and you have the tools to protect your computer from harm – then this type of broadband is a literally ‘wireless’, high-speed, hassle-free and convenient way to connect to the Internet.

 

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Why on earth would someone make a statement like that…"The backbone of the commonplace internet?" What exactly is that suppose to mean? It means what it says. DSL is the workhorse of the internet as we know it today. Many people would argue with me that things like T3, DS3 or direct fiber lines carry the most traffic.

That may be well and true, but the majority of Americans who actually use the internet, don’t have a DS3 or T3 or even a T1. They live in the real world where usually the best they can have offered is some form of DSL or cable service. Yes, there are some newly constructed areas which have fiber connections available, however, they are far from being a majority or even a number significant to be noticed in the total number of overall internet users.

Yes, there are a large number of cable users who have their internet service delivered via the local cable company. Cable claims great speeds up to 20mbs, and possibly on rare occasions you might actually see speeds that approach about 2/3rds or that threshold. But the moon is probably blue and its 3:30 a.m. when the rest of the neighborhood is in bed. When internet service via cable was first introduced it was a great deal because few people had it. Now that more and more people are using it, it is becoming less and less effective because of the shared feed system that most systems use to deliver bandwidth over cable.

What this means is that the junction point from where cable internet service is provided in your local neighborhood only has a finite amount of bandwidth available. The more people who are connected to that junction point, the less bandwidth is available to each user of the shared access point. This didn’t use to be a big concern. However, more and more, with internet activity becoming more a part of everyday life for a greater amount of people it has become apparent to many cable users that the great deal isn’t such a great deal after all.

DSL speeds vary from 256kbs to 8mbs depending on your service plan and distance from the main switching station of the local telecom company. The advantage that DSL has over cable is that it is fairly consistent speed wise, and in many places is now cheaper then service provided by cable.

Then, of course, there is still dial up. New companies claim to have access speeds approaching those of DSL which, of course, is a bit of a stretch no matter how you slice it. What they don’t tell you is "those speeds approaching DSL speed are burst speeds that might actually reach the 56k limitation of simple modem to modem dial up access. One needs to look closely at the fine print in the ads of those companies which claim super fast dialup service. For example one company states in fine print at the bottom of their ad that their fast service is not a broadband service and actual data transmission rates are not faster than standard dial-up Internet service.

One other avenue to the internet for home users is satellite internet service. Again, satellite is one of those services that never quite live up to its tout. Many companies claim up to 1.5mbs speeds when in actuality the speeds are more in the range of 512 to 756kbs. That is if you are lucky to have a good clear sky and a strong signal. The down side of satellite internet service is the cost. It is generally about double or even triple the cost of a similar DSL service. The advantage that satellite service has is it is virtually available anywhere, making it a popular choice of those who live in very remote areas where cable and DSL service is not available.

So back to my original statement that DSL is the backbone of the internet, meaning it is the workhorse of the internet. Studies have proven that clearly 77% of those connecting to the internet these days have chosen some from of broadband service. Of that 77% DSL is currently edging out cable. Not so much because it is dramatically superior to cable, but because satellite television has gained market share. Those who once subscribed to cable and now use satellite television no longer have cable accesses for internet service and have generally opted for DSL service.

In conclusion I think it would be safe to say that without all the people who use DSL service those big companies who invest in large fiber optic trunk lines to transfer copious amounts of information and sell billions of dollars of products each and every year, would find the internet a far less profitable place to do business if it were not for all of the DSL users in the world today.

Article Autor:Scott Best          To learn more , check out the myfreedomdsl.com site.

What is ISDN?

ISDN technologies were originally designed in the 1980’s, succeeding in allowing a video conferencing system to work effectively where earlier attempts had generally failed. An ISDN-based video conferencing system allows users to send two or more types of data (such as audio, video, text, or fax transmissions) simultaneously through a standard telephone connection in a digital format.
A minimum transfer rate is maintained throughout, so as to help prevent choppy video, glitches in audio, and so many other problems that were common with early attempts at creating a video conferencing system.

ISDN was originally envisioned as a very fast service, but this was a long time ago when it was hoped to have fiber all the way to your house. It turned out that running all that fiber would be too expensive, so they designed ISDN to run on the copper wiring that you already have. Unfortunately, that slowed things down considerably – too slow for quality video, for instance.
ISDN is available now in many places, but it is not widely used. Further most of the products and services that people have forecast for ISDN still aren’t available.

B-ISDN

B-ISDN is Broadband ISDN. This is not simply faster ISDN, or ISDN with the copper to your home finally upgraded to fiber. B-ISDN is a complete redesign. It is still capable of providing all the integrated services (voice, data, video, etc.) through a single interface just like ISDN was supposed to. But it will do it a lot faster than ISDN could. Of course, that copper to your house will still have to be replaced with fiber. But B-ISDN is still in development – it seems to be moving faster than ISDN, but it is still quite a ways off.

ISDN is now used mostly as an alternative to analog connections, most commonly for Internet access. Some of the services envisioned as being delivered over ISDN are now delivered over the Internet instead.

People use a wireless internet connection in different settings for various reasons but there is one binding desire that links all people that invest in a wireless internet connection. That is the desire to not clog up their home or office with cables necessary to connect to the internet. When the internet was first introduced the only way to connect to it was through dialing a modem on your computer and taking up the phone line. In the very early days if you wanted more than one computer to access the internet then you either needed multiple phone lines or somehow figure out how to split the phone line.

This was a fun novelty at first but soon it got to be tedious and when you add in the fact that the phone companies still charged by the minute back in those days you got a pretty expensive internet connection. Companies avoided too many internet connections because of the cost or insisted that their internet providers have a toll free number for internet access which got to be expensive for the providers. Soon the phone companies came around and offered bulk calling packages where you could call any number in the United States for one monthly charge and the internet boomed. Then broadband internet entered the picture and everything changed again.

Faster Faster I Need More Speed!

After a while cable television companies started offering high speed internet service and the phone companies followed suit with their version of high speed internet called DSL. Now not only were more people accessing the internet but they were doing it at speeds faster than ever before. The best thing about high speed internet and DSL is that you could get a router and share the signal among multiple computers. This was great except for the cabling all over the place. Enter the wireless internet connection. Nothing has done more to increase the sale of computers in this country than the wireless internet connection because now we could easily connect multiple computers to the same internet connection without all the cables. Nirvana had been achieved.

A wireless internet connection requires a broadband high speed modem, a router, a wireless access point, and wireless network cards on the computers. Today your wireless connection can be made with a unit that is a combination router and wireless access point which is much easier to configure and cheaper to buy. With the advent of the wireless internet connection internet providers have finally embraced the wireless internet routers. For years providers hated the routers because they felt that if customers wanted multiple connections in their home they should pay for multiple connections. But in the end the "if you can’t beat ‘em join ‘em" mentality won out and now a wireless internet router is a standard piece of equipment with your new wireless internet connection.

Article Autor:Ralphy Jarvis To learn more , check out the wirelessforinternet.com site.
 
 

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