Free Internet Speed Test | Tips and Tricks to Improve Your Internet Speed Quickly

One of the common problems among internet users is testing their internet connection to pinpoint the exact problem. There is a big number of internet users who use DSL, and cable modem service.

You set us your connection the way your ISP (internet service provider)instruct you to. Sometimes, it doesn’t work for numerous reasons.

You service is not ready, your hardware in not connected properly, or your ISP is having problems.

Whatever the cause of the problem maybe, there are some diagnostic tools you can use in Windows XP, in order to identify the problem.

If you are not exact in your diagnostic, you will get a good idea at least.

Before we get to the diagnostic tools, let us discuss what is involved in an internet connection.

The information travels over the internet to your computer through your ISP service. This is done through a High speed modem then to a network card installed in your computer.

Your computer is called a host, your service provider will give you the DNS IP address, and you get your login and password. That is all what you have from your ISP.

Sometimes, your internet connection fails, and you want to find out the problem. You may be able to fix it, or at least get some information about the problem to advise your isp for help.

You will start by accessing the command prompt by going in sequence to:

Start menu, program, accessories, then command prompt. A window will open where you type commands from the prompt.

At the command prompt, you type: IPCONFIG. This command will give you the active network connection on your computer. Here is an example:

PPP adapter Copy :

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 68.239.158.45
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 68.239.158.45

The above output was produced when I ran the Ipconfig command on my own computer running Window XP OS, and A DSL connection. The IP address is my computer address assigned by the ISP.

Please note, you can add an option to this command, in order to get more detailed information about your connection. Here is the output, when I ran the same command with the "all" option.

Ipconfig /ALL

PPP adapter Copy :

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 68.239.158.45
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 68.239.158.45
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 151.198.0.39 151.197.0.39 NetBIOS over TCP/IP. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Notice now, the output includes the phisycal address of the network interface card installed in my computer. Also, you see the DNS IP addresses. With the above information, I didn’t have any problems.

Supposed ,I disconnect my DSL connection and ran the command again, this is the new result:

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :

Notice in this case, where I disconnected my connection, you don’t get a DNS server. This tells you that I am not connected to the internet.

Also, notice the IP address starts with 192.168, which is the default address whenever your computer is not connected to the internet.

Another command is the ping command. It will allow to check if a computer is connected to the network and ready to communicate, whether intranet, or internet.

Once you run it,it will sent a packet to the computer specified and gives the time it took for the packet to travel. This is an a output when I tried to ping www.yahoo.com:

C:>ping www.yahoo.com

Pinging www.yahoo.akadns.net [216.109.118.66] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 216.109.118.66: bytes=32 time=35ms TTL=55
Reply from 216.109.118.66: bytes=32 time=39ms TTL=55

Ping statistics for 216.109.118.66:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 35ms, Maximum = 39ms, Average = 38ms.

That shows that the host was reachable, and connected to the internet.

A very important command is the Nslookup. This will let you check if DNS (domain name server) is working properly. The function of the DNS server is to translate ip addresses to domain name of the networked computer. Here is an example:

C:> nslookup www.yahoo.com
Server: home5.bellatlantic.net
Address: 151.198.0.39

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: www.yahoo.akadns.net
Addresses: 216.109.118.67
Aliases: www.yahoo.com

So, you enter the name after Nslookup, it will give you IP addresses and vice versa.

In summary, there more commands in Windows Xp, but using the three above commands should give you a good idea about your internet connection problems. You can find where the problem is occurring. Is it your machine, or the ISP.

Thanks,
George Chamoun

For tips about your Windows XP computer, visit our new website: http://www.ResolveWindowsXpProblems.com

Why on earth would someone make a statement like that…"The backbone of the commonplace internet?" What exactly is that suppose to mean? It means what it says. DSL is the workhorse of the internet as we know it today. Many people would argue with me that things like T3, DS3 or direct fiber lines carry the most traffic.

That may be well and true, but the majority of Americans who actually use the internet, don’t have a DS3 or T3 or even a T1. They live in the real world where usually the best they can have offered is some form of DSL or cable service. Yes, there are some newly constructed areas which have fiber connections available, however, they are far from being a majority or even a number significant to be noticed in the total number of overall internet users.

Yes, there are a large number of cable users who have their internet service delivered via the local cable company. Cable claims great speeds up to 20mbs, and possibly on rare occasions you might actually see speeds that approach about 2/3rds or that threshold. But the moon is probably blue and its 3:30 a.m. when the rest of the neighborhood is in bed. When internet service via cable was first introduced it was a great deal because few people had it. Now that more and more people are using it, it is becoming less and less effective because of the shared feed system that most systems use to deliver bandwidth over cable.

What this means is that the junction point from where cable internet service is provided in your local neighborhood only has a finite amount of bandwidth available. The more people who are connected to that junction point, the less bandwidth is available to each user of the shared access point. This didn’t use to be a big concern. However, more and more, with internet activity becoming more a part of everyday life for a greater amount of people it has become apparent to many cable users that the great deal isn’t such a great deal after all.

DSL speeds vary from 256kbs to 8mbs depending on your service plan and distance from the main switching station of the local telecom company. The advantage that DSL has over cable is that it is fairly consistent speed wise, and in many places is now cheaper then service provided by cable.

Then, of course, there is still dial up. New companies claim to have access speeds approaching those of DSL which, of course, is a bit of a stretch no matter how you slice it. What they don’t tell you is "those speeds approaching DSL speed are burst speeds that might actually reach the 56k limitation of simple modem to modem dial up access. One needs to look closely at the fine print in the ads of those companies which claim super fast dialup service. For example one company states in fine print at the bottom of their ad that their fast service is not a broadband service and actual data transmission rates are not faster than standard dial-up Internet service.

One other avenue to the internet for home users is satellite internet service. Again, satellite is one of those services that never quite live up to its tout. Many companies claim up to 1.5mbs speeds when in actuality the speeds are more in the range of 512 to 756kbs. That is if you are lucky to have a good clear sky and a strong signal. The down side of satellite internet service is the cost. It is generally about double or even triple the cost of a similar DSL service. The advantage that satellite service has is it is virtually available anywhere, making it a popular choice of those who live in very remote areas where cable and DSL service is not available.

So back to my original statement that DSL is the backbone of the internet, meaning it is the workhorse of the internet. Studies have proven that clearly 77% of those connecting to the internet these days have chosen some from of broadband service. Of that 77% DSL is currently edging out cable. Not so much because it is dramatically superior to cable, but because satellite television has gained market share. Those who once subscribed to cable and now use satellite television no longer have cable accesses for internet service and have generally opted for DSL service.

In conclusion I think it would be safe to say that without all the people who use DSL service those big companies who invest in large fiber optic trunk lines to transfer copious amounts of information and sell billions of dollars of products each and every year, would find the internet a far less profitable place to do business if it were not for all of the DSL users in the world today.

Article Autor:Scott Best          To learn more , check out the myfreedomdsl.com site.

What is ISDN?

ISDN technologies were originally designed in the 1980’s, succeeding in allowing a video conferencing system to work effectively where earlier attempts had generally failed. An ISDN-based video conferencing system allows users to send two or more types of data (such as audio, video, text, or fax transmissions) simultaneously through a standard telephone connection in a digital format.
A minimum transfer rate is maintained throughout, so as to help prevent choppy video, glitches in audio, and so many other problems that were common with early attempts at creating a video conferencing system.

ISDN was originally envisioned as a very fast service, but this was a long time ago when it was hoped to have fiber all the way to your house. It turned out that running all that fiber would be too expensive, so they designed ISDN to run on the copper wiring that you already have. Unfortunately, that slowed things down considerably – too slow for quality video, for instance.
ISDN is available now in many places, but it is not widely used. Further most of the products and services that people have forecast for ISDN still aren’t available.

B-ISDN

B-ISDN is Broadband ISDN. This is not simply faster ISDN, or ISDN with the copper to your home finally upgraded to fiber. B-ISDN is a complete redesign. It is still capable of providing all the integrated services (voice, data, video, etc.) through a single interface just like ISDN was supposed to. But it will do it a lot faster than ISDN could. Of course, that copper to your house will still have to be replaced with fiber. But B-ISDN is still in development – it seems to be moving faster than ISDN, but it is still quite a ways off.

ISDN is now used mostly as an alternative to analog connections, most commonly for Internet access. Some of the services envisioned as being delivered over ISDN are now delivered over the Internet instead.

Cable ISPs

Various companies today provide Internet services in a number of mediums that depends upon the various geographical and demographic factors. The mediums for Internet services include satellite, cable broadband, ISDN, DSL, and dial-up.

The cable Internet service is provided by a tie-up between the local cable TV company and an ISP (Internet Service Provider). A television signal occupies 6 Mhz on the coaxial cable, which is used to deliver cable television signals. There is a lot of unused space left over in the coaxial cable that can deliver broadband Internet.

Cable Internet speed is inversely proportional to the number of users. This causes the speed to deteriorate during peak hours. The cable company may offer a discount for ordering both cable TV and cable broadband service from them. However, a survey report states that 24% of all cable connections need to be repaired at some point or the other. DSL connections are comparatively better, where only about 12% need to be repaired.

A modem is usually provided free of charge with the package, which can be either external or internal to the CPU. It can even be a part of the set-top box.

To connect to Internet at much faster speeds, cable modems use existing cable-wire network. As the same line is shared with other users in the area, it could lead to congestion problems and other such performance related issues. The speed is much higher in the case of DSL and not too expensive either.

Cable networks share the line that compromises on privacy. Hacking tools are easier to use on cable modems. It is possible to access secure information through them.

In a recent ruling, the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) classified cable-modem service as an ?informative service?, thereby distinguishing it from cable or telecommunication services. This means that now the large ISPs do not have to share their network with smaller competitors.

Article Autor:Kevin Stith          To learn more , check out the ISPs site.
 
 

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