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The Wireless Wizard improves the use and reliability of any WiFi, WiMAX, LTE, 3G or 2G data network. It allows you to aim your wireless adapter, measure wireless performance and quickly identify and fix problems typically encountered on a wireless data network. The Wireless Wizard works with your home or business network, as well as all leading mobile service providers including AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, Clearwire T-Mobile, Vodafone, Orange, NTT, Comcast, Telenor, Yota, numberswiki.com

WiBro, UQ, DigitalBridge, and AzulStar. You can add your own wireless networks and the Wizard will recognize them the next time you or anyone connects to that network. The Wizard is very light weight and does not modify any drivers so it can be used with any Wireless adapter.

License: Free

Limitations: No limitations

Download Now (2.1 MB)

AT&T announced the availability of their coast-to-coast IP/MPLS (Multiprotocol Label Switching) network, able to deliver speeds of up to 40Gbps. The infrastructure is powered by Cisco Systems core routers that allow the provider to quadruple the network capacity.

The backbone network provides 40 Gbps speed without using multiplexing technology to combine multiple digital signals into an optical channel. AT&T’s backbone network is ready to provide a wide range of IT solutions, including wireless data, business video, data and voice services, private line and wavelength traffic, as well as IP-based residential services for the company’s 13.8 million customers.

"As the demand for Internet and IP-based applications continues to explode, IP traffic on the AT&T network has doubled throughout the past two years, and we fully expect this substantial growth to continue in the future", said John Stankey, group president of Telecom Operations at AT&T. "Our industry-leading deployment of 40-Gigabit technology enables us to stay ahead of our customers’ growing need for bandwidth and to continually deliver the fast, reliable connectivity our customers need to connect with their world."

The 40 Gbps backbone network is designed to continue the transport even if a network link or node has been disrupted. AT&T has announced that in the following months they will further enhance the network architecture to add homed edge sites, able to provide other network paths through hubs, joined to the MPLS Fast Reroute technology to enable service resume in sub-second times.

The network upgrade is powered by Cisco’s Carrier Routing System (CRS-1), that provides a scalable and flexible platform for the company’s futher expanding network. The current backbone is designed for continuous operation with the ability to be scaled up to 92 Terabits per second (Tbps).

"Cisco and AT&T have worked closely over the past several years to develop an extensive range of IP-based services that change how people live, work, learn and play", said Kelly Ahuja, vice president and general manager of the core routing business unit at Cisco. "We’re extremely pleased today to announce support for the deployment of AT&T’s OC-768 backbone network, the critical foundation for both its managed business services and consumer traffic."

Verizon this week officially became the nation’s largest wireless operator, finalizing their $27 billion deal to acquire Alltel. Verizon is paying $5.9 billion and acquiring $22.2 billion in Alltel debt, and will in turn get about 13 million new customers — for a total of 83 million customers. For reference, AT&T has 74.9 million, Sprint has 50.5 million, and T-Mobile has 32.1 million. While consumer advocates fought the deal, saying it would only serve to reduce competition, it was approved by the FTC, FCC and Justice Department.

Alltel customers are now included in the Mobile to Mobile calling family of Verizon Wireless. Verizon customers have unlimited calling to Alltel customers in place, though Alltel customers still have to pay — for the time being. Verizon Wireless customers can check to see if their friend’s numbers are eligible for unlimited Mobile to Mobile minutes by using this tool.

According to the post, Verizon plans to convert Alltel customers to Verizon Wireless billing within two to three months, with a full brand conversion within six months.

There’s a full integration FAQ at the Verizon website here.

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) Internet is a form of Internet commonly used today by taking advantage of existing telephone infrastructure lines and manipulating them so that a wire not only transmits voice, but also data. The technique has exploded in popularity and competes directly against cable Internet subscriptions. It is most popularly known by its ADSL version (the ýAý standing for ýAysmmetricý) but in fact a customer seeking DSL services today has many more options. The difference between the various versions of DSL lies in speed and quality. Since the DSL technology is not flawless (unfortunately, as with many other inventions we come across), improvements are continuously made to overcome the frustrations and barriers that get in the way of connectionýs smooth flow. Thus, there are now approximately 13 DSL standards.

Getting in the way of a DSL connection can include the following:

A phone line made of bad quality copper. There may not be much you can do about this one.

An Internet Service Provider with bad service. Some are just better than others, and often you pay more to get more.

Remoteness of destination. If you, or your computer, lives in the middle of nowhere, expect that the quality of your DSL will eventually deteriorate as it huffs and puffs to make it to the finish line (i.e. your router).

A wireless connection that just isnýt happeniný. Often the connection is blamed, when in fact itýs the wireless router thatýs not sending signals fast enough, thus rendering your high-speed Internet useless.

Software, often the uninvited kind. This is usually not your fault, but you can help it by regularly cleaning your computer of stuff that you never meant to download, but got downloaded anyway because you got tricked into it by some hacker, and never found out. These programs are called ýSpywareý and eat your bandwidth speeds like a worm in your tummy.

In some of these instances itýs possible to take reasonable action (for example, switching providers), whereas in others youýll just have to live with what youýve got. What you can do is equip yourself with the right knowledge to know what youýre buying when you chose a DSL service and what ýspeedý will really mean to you. So, when an Internet Service Provider (ISP) advertises such and such speeds for paying for their services, keep in mind the following:

Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)) is the most commonly offered service. The ýAsymmetricý part of the title means that speeds going one way are not equal to speeds going another way. In other words, downloading is always going to be faster than uploading. Downloading includes activities such as viewing Web sites, checking e-mail, streaming audio or video and basically anything where another server needs to send information to you. Uploading is a mirror activity of downloading and happens every time you send information to another computer. For example, sending an e-mail would be considered uploading. ADSL is a typical service offered to home-based users. Usually, when ISPs advertise their bandwidth speeds they leave out the ýsmall printý about the significantly slower upload rates. But in most cases, you should be able to find out both numbers.

Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL) is a service where both download and upload speeds are equal in bandwidth. SDSL is gaining popularity in Europe, but at this point in North America it remains an expensive alternative to ADSL, despite the demand. A business would benefit greatly from SDSL when considering file sharing among computers in a network and using a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) to upload files to a server. When running oneýs own Web site, uploading speeds may be more critical than downloading speeds since the serverýs primary function would be consistently feed out data.

Fiber lines are for the really serious players that demand high speeds going both ways. In essence, paying for a personal fiber line means no one shares the connection that goes all the way from the ISP to your router ý no one. The installation, not to mention subscription rates of a fiber line could cost thousands.

There are alternatives when SDSL or owning your own fiber is not an option within reach. Information Technology (IT) companies are able to get creative when they need to find a way to do more with less. When high costs are out of the question for its clients, some may offer the option of combining multiple ADSL lines together to achieve both a higher upload and download rate. Marketing principles tend to limit user upload speeds so that businesses that need the extra bandwidth will be willing to pay for it. In areas where monopolies rule, it may be hard to find competitive Internet service options, but itýs not impossible. Keep your eye on the lookout.

Saleh Tousi is the CEO of SmarttNet, a Vancouver IT company offering comprehensive business Internet services including business DSL since 1995.

 
 

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